Be your own Certificate Authority (CA)

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This article describes how to become your own Certificate Authority (CA) and issue your own server certificates. Be advised that noone else, apart from you, your internal network’s people or your friends, will or should trust this kind of certificates (self-signed). These are intended only for providing secure communication with your own services or for testing purposes.

Set up the VNC Server in Fedora

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This article describes in brief how to configure VNC server instances for one or multiple users on a remote machine, how to use VNC to start graphical applications on boot and finally how to enhance security by connecting to the server through encrypted SSH tunnels.

Red Hat RPM Guide

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The original Red Hat RPM Guide, which had been released under the Open Publication Licence is no longer available under fedora.redhat.com. However, a more recent revision of this document, named the RPM Guide, is available as part of the Fedora Project Documentation and is released under a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (CC-BY-SA).…

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Print to CUPS printer instances

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This Nautilus script was written because gnome-print does not list the user-defined or system-wide CUPS printer instances in the printers list. "Printer instances" are just sets of settings, so that a user does not have to type them for every print. Check the CUPS documentation for more info. So, in order to use your defined…

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Mass download

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I’ve written this script so that I can download multiple files of the same type from a web page. The file extension can be defined in a dialog box that appears as soon as the script is run. It uses Lynx to parse the web page for links and Zenity for the dialogs. The desired…

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The use of the uppercase X in chmod

I am aware that there are numerous guides about file permissions in linux out there. This post is not intended to be another tutorial. I just wanted to emphasize the use of uppercase X when modifying regular file or directory permissions. This info seems to be missing from most of those guides.