WordPress is getting better

The first time I used WordPress back in September 2005 I considered it to be the content publishing platform of choice as far as a personal or business website was concerned. It was easy to set up and publish content and, also, easy to customize, even with ugly hacks. Today I still consider WordPress to be the overall best choice, despite the fact it still does not excel in any particular sector. Although I am not a pro, I have enough experience to say it’s the engine with the most acceptable trade-off between ease of use, security, features, ease of customization and being a solid base for development upon it. It is also one of those open-source projects that can create business opportunities for software engineers, system administrators, web designers, internet advertisers and marketers. The huge and active community of users and developers have boosted this project over the years. It proves that, if an open-source project is surrounded by a big active community and has good marketing (like WordPress had all these years) it can fly and create business opportunities in many sectors. During the last days I spent much time trying some of the features that have been implemented in the newer releases of WordPress and also various plugins. I must admit that today, by using WordPress, it is just a matter of some hours to have a high performance, good looking and feature rich small web site from scratch with minimal cost.

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About George Notaras

George Notaras is the editor of G-Loaded Journal, a technical blog about Free and Open-Source Software. George, among other things, is an enthusiast self-taught GNU/Linux system administrator. He has created this web site to share the IT knowledge and experience he has gained over the years with other people. George primarily uses CentOS and Fedora. He has also developed some open-source software projects in his spare time.